Q&A: Women’s History Month at Michigan Ross

As Women’s History Month comes to an end, we want to celebrate the contributions that women have made and continue to make in history and society. At Michigan Ross, we are privileged to work every day alongside incredible women who are making a positive impact in business, business education, and beyond. 

To celebrate Women’s History Month, we reached out to some of our faculty and staff members to learn about their proudest accomplishments, passion projects, and what this month means to them.


Lisa Bradley-Kern
Director of Employer Relations, Career Development Office

What is one of your proudest accomplishments (career/personal) thus far in your life?
My proudest accomplishment was obtaining the rank of chief master sergeant within the Michigan Air National Guard. I’m now retired, but I served in the Air National Guard for 28 years. By federal law, no more than 1.25% of the Air Force enlisted force may actively hold the rank of chief master sergeant. From 2015-2018, I served as the only female chief master sergeant stationed at Selfridge Air National Guard Base. While stationed at Selfridge and assigned to the 127th Operations Group, I was the primary advisor to the group commander regarding all matters that affected the enlisted personnel assigned within the group.

What passion projects or organizations are you involved with to help support, inspire, and/or advocate for the next generation?
At Ross, I have had the opportunity to work with the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management. The Consortium works to increase diversity in MBA programs throughout the United States. Through my involvement with the Consortium when I was a member of the Office of Admissions, I had the ability to mentor prospective MBA students to gain admission to Ross. In my current role within the CDO, I have the ability to mentor students through the job search process.

What does Women’s History Month mean to you and how do you feel about the advancements that have been made by women in society?
Women’s History Month is a way to recognize and celebrate the many accomplishments that women have made in history. I have admired women like Lynn Wooten, PhD ’95, the first Black President at Simmons University, and Kamala Harris, the first black woman to serve as vice president of the United States. Women continue to be trailblazers within their respective fields and it brings me joy to celebrate the impact they have on our society.


Jun Li
Associate Professor of Technology and Operations
Faculty Director of Master of Supply Chain Management

What is one of your proudest accomplishments (career/personal) thus far in your life?
I am an educator and a mother. I have taught over 2,500 students who have become very successful in their lives and careers as proud parents, doctors, lawyers, business leaders, entrepreneurs, etc. Seeing my students’ success is always the biggest inspiration for me.

What passion projects or organizations are you involved with to help support, inspire, and/or advocate for the next generation?
I am leading a series of projects aimed at understanding and addressing the childcare crisis in the country. The United States is the only wealthy country in the world that does not have a national mandatory paid maternity leave policy. Not only do we need paid maternity; we need paid paternity leave. When fathers participate in children’s early development, they make a lasting impact on them. If we don’t see the value in investing in our people today, there is no possibility that our country will remain the economic leader and innovation center in the future.

What does Women’s History Month mean to you and how do you feel about the advancements that have been made for women in society?
This is a moment to cherish how much women have contributed to the advancements of human history as innovators, social and business leaders, educators, mothers, partners, and daughters. This is also a moment to reflect upon how as a society we could unleash the powers of women. However, there is still a long way to go for us to realize and acknowledge the true value of women and help to empower them.


Sarah Miller
Associate Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy

What is one of your proudest accomplishments (career/personal) thus far in your life?
My proudest accomplishment is being a mom to my wonderful 6-year-old son, William. My proudest professional accomplishment is winning the American Society for Health Economists Medal awarded to the economist under age 40 who has made the most significant contributions to the field of health economics. And, of course, getting tenure at Ross!

What passion projects or organizations are you involved with to help support, inspire, and/or advocate for the next generation?
I really enjoy working with the PhD students and seeing their own ideas grow into exciting projects.

What does Women’s History Month mean to you and how do you feel about the advancements that have been made by women in society?
In the economics profession, it is so heartening to see all of the advancements made by women over the past 30 years. The percent of economics PhDs awarded to women increased by 10 percentage points between 1994 and 2022, and now nearly 35% of economics PhD recipients are women. And, the percentage of full professors in economics who are women has increased from only a few percentage points to almost 15%. I am amazed by the women who came before me in the profession and fought against stereotypes to help pave the way for many women to thrive in the field of economics today, especially my female senior colleagues at Michigan Ross.


Jennifer Steben
Managing Director of Custom Programs, Executive Education

What is one of your proudest accomplishments (career/personal) thus far in your life?
In 2018, I was elected to public office to serve as a trustee to Saline, Michigan’s board of education, and in 2020 I was selected to lead as president for two years during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. I was part of a wave of women who stepped up to help lead calmly and with empathy in a challenging time. Through this, I have been able to model volunteerism for my own children, but also amplify the voices of historically marginalized groups and advocate for every student and staff member in our district. By taking the things I learn in the classroom at Ross through our incredible faculty, I marry those to my board duties and vice versa. Having this experience has forever changed me as a leader and as a person.

What passion projects or organizations are you involved with to help support, inspire, and/or advocate for the next generation?
I sit on the board of directors for Girls on the Run of Southeastern Michigan, an organization that provides lessons on confidence, teamwork, and healthy habits to girls in the second through eighth grade. In addition, I teach Junior Achievement to second-graders, introducing them to entrepreneurship and financial literacy. I also am a member of Inforum, a not-for-profit based in Detroit that empowers women executives to lift up others. With Inforum, I manage our women in leadership program at Michigan Ross, Ascending to the C-Suite.

What does Women’s History Month mean to you and how do you feel about the advancements that have been made by women in society?
Daily, I think about how I can improve the situation for my daughter and generations to come. I am intentional in saying yes to things that support my purpose of lifelong learning and equality for all. While I am pleased to see the increasing support for DEI globally, we have a long way to go. I listen to the women in the organizations we serve in EE and many are in crisis. The pandemic has placed a magnifying glass on the gap we still have in terms of childcare management, pay, microaggressions in the workplace, and opportunity. Each month of the year, I will do anything I can to support positive change. Empowered women empower other women, and there are a whole lot of us at Ross!

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